Give Me A Break

On Thursday afternoon, I saw my 59th doctor, a neurosurgeon. At least, I think he was #59. I don’t feel like going back in my previous posts to make sure. I could be like that person who doesn’t want to admit that their birthdays keep happening so they claim to be 29 & holding.

The ride out was long. The conversation with the cabbie was lively. His name was Isaac. I found out he has a wife and five children who still live in Uganda. He goes back every 6-8 months to spend time with them when he has saved up enough money. I can’t imagine having to live like that, my loves living half a world away. He told me about the worst job he ever had (digging pits that were 20 feet deep, 16×16 wide/long with a pick ax and then having to haul away the dirt himself because there was no machinery). The pits were for storing water. We talked about what shocked him the most when he moved to Minnesota the first time, which was snow (before global warming kicked in, the state used to get dumped on so that sometimes the snow would be thigh high) and teenage pregnancy (in his culture, girls would live with their parents until they were married and they never spent time with boys until the marriage happened). We talked about how violent men are towards women in the States, and how women are so accommodating and undemanding of the men, as in, “It’s okay if you don’t work. Here, lemme make you a sandwich and buy you a house.” See? Lots of sharing.

In my appointment, I first talked the physician’s assistant through everything and demonstrated how my symptoms disappear when I tilt my head parallel to the floor. He asked if I had seen the one doctor I had asked to see, and I said I hadn’t. He asked why, and I said, “Because he said there wasn’t anything wrong with me.” The PA couldn’t hide his bafflement. He said it was obvious that my ventricles were completely gone. He did a few of the standard neurological tests like having me squeeze my eyes shut, follow his finger with my eyes, push and pull his arms, etc. Then he went to get the neurosurgeon.

The neurosurgeon came in and after our introductions, he said he had talked to my neurologist. He mentioned that they thought I was overdraining, and I shot that down immediately. I told him that my lumbar puncture came out with a high opening pressure and I hadn’t had anything surgically done since then. I also told him that I had a leak for an entire year so I know the difference between overdraining and underdraining and they are completely different sensations. For me, the underdraining always brings vertigo, fatigue and the facial droop. Overdraining will never bring paralysis for me; instead, I get the tire-iron-beating-me-in-the-skull pain. 

We talked about the fact that there hasn’t been new shunt materials in ages. We talked about the near-impossible task of finding materials that I won’t be allergic to since I’ve had so many already and I’ve reacted to them.

We also talked about the mass that’s growing on my right side. I asked him if it was at least possible to take that out. I’ve been having pain on the right side that radiates down my neck, and if it’s killing brain tissue and turning it to jelly (which it is according to the MRI), then I’d like to get rid of it. However, because of where it is – in my cerebellum – it’s in a bad spot for a craniotomy. As of November it had grown to about the size of a quarter (not sure what size it is now). 

The neurosurgeon doesn’t want to operate on me at this point. He wants to repeat the upright MRI in about six months to check the size of the mass. He expects it to interfere with my coordination; it might be what’s causing my legs to jerk uncontrollably right now.

So, that’s the plan. Follow up in six months. No surgery right now. Wait for the mass/tumor to get bigger and my symptoms to get worse.

Luckily the same cab driver drove me back – he stayed nearby so it wouldn’t be a long wait for me, thank goodness. The office was really way out in the middle of nowhere by city standards. But the ride back was completely different. Isaac was trying to get me to talk, but I couldn’t. I was overwhelmed and upset, and trying (but failing) not to cry in front of this total stranger. It was just a few sniffles, not an ugly cry, thank goodness. 

That evening I got home and received a notice that my primary care doctor is leaving the practice (and maybe even the state). During our last visit in March she had tried to talk to me about palliative care, but said she would wait for me to decide.

Just so I don’t lose my mind, I have to stop pursuing another opinion on the neurosurgery side for the time being. I’m getting a lot of well-meaning advice about how I should just “stay strong” and “keep going” and “don’t give up.” Honestly, though, I’ve been going at this for nearly seven years. This isn’t fibromyalgia, which I’ve had for 20 years – and I’m not knocking anyone who has it, it’s a beast; and this isn’t Hashimoto’s, which I’ve had for 12 years and again I’m not trying to put anyone down, but this is a whole new level of sick. I was able to work through that shit, even if I had to sleep after work and sleep through weekends. My brain is literally being crushed and I have a mass that’s growing in my cerebellum. There aren’t good days and bad days. I need a break from having to be my own advocate for this really rare orphan disease as I drag my sick ass around from neurosurgeon to neurosurgeon to try to convince them that what they are seeing is real (because it’s right there on the MRI).  

In the meantime, I have plenty of other things to keep me busy and other doctors to visit. We just won’t be tapping into my skull right now.

Are You An Organ Donor?

I have friends who have received organs from living donors, from cadaver donors and from donors who have indicated that they wanted to donate their organs and tissues in the event that they suffered trauma that they could not recover from.

There just aren’t enough organs for the people that are listed. And organ rejection is a real concern. But scientists are looking to pigs to fill in the gaps on how we can avoid rejection:

New Hope in Organ Donation Crisis

Also, this story has been making headlines from the Mayo clinic, based here in Minnesota. It’s the first facial transplant that the Mayo has attempted. It was also surreal to realize as I was originally reading the article that I have a personal connection to one of the families. I was not much younger than Lilly when her mom and I met each other and became fast friends while attending a school for the arts. I can’t imagine going through all that she has – marriage, pregnancy, the sudden loss of her spouse, and then deciding to go ahead with this donation – at her age, but damn, she has done good. By the way, their baby boy is absolutely adorable, and absolutely adored.

Mayo Clinic Performs First Face Transplant

We have so far to go with science and healthcare. We don’t know all there is to know. We have to keep moving forward, and supporting lawmakers who approve budgets for science.

 

Bring It On(line) – Trusting PatientBank With Your Medical Records

I have purchased some awfully pretty, recycled 3-ring binders to haul around my most relevant medical records to my doctor appointments. They’re intimidating because they’re large and they’re many. I also have my own laser printer/copier/fax in my tiny studio apartment. It was the single-most best score from when I lost my job – my former employer let me keep it as my consolation prize, of sorts. But for the love of all that is holy, I cannot carry all of that with me to every appointment. But I need it all! One doctor told me that they have 1,200 pages in their system from only the last 6.5 years that is a combination of what they have logged themselves, and what I have given them.

This is where PatientBank comes in. Disclaimer: I have been given access to PatientBank.us as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

When I received this assignment, I was encouraged to have this company request as many and as much of my medical records as possible. Little did they know that in the last 6.5 years I had seen 57 doctors in 2 different states and who knows how many disciplines (I think 8? Possibly  more). Now, I had just gone through quite a lot of nastiness getting some records because I’ve been trying to get disability as well as go through the process of getting my case looked at by the Undiagnosed Diseases Network through the NIH, so I had had an influx of records shortly before this opportunity.

However, I didn’t have a lot of the records from the past year and a half. The Undiagnosed Diseases Network wanted to go back 10-20 years prior, and my attorney had gotten some records sent directly to him for the more recent stuff, so I figured I could still give PatientBank a pretty good run. I created a login and password at PatientBank and the first logical place to go for new users is to create a new request:

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In this case, I’d like to request a copy of my records from a doctor in Minneapolis, so I can search by his/her name and the state. If his/her name is in the system, I can choose it in the menu. If it isn’t, there is an option to add it.

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After you choose the correct physician, you can specify the date you visited, and whether or not you want “sensitive” info included. If you are not sure what sensitive info means exactly, you can let your mouse hover over the blue text and the black text box pops up and explains what might be included.

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Then you click on “Add to my order.” I got the pop-up screen with a prompt to sign to release my records. Here’s where it’s really, really tricky, folks. I have a touch-screen laptop. You might get pretty good results if you use a smartphone/iPhone. This pop-up window gives you the instruction to “click and hold down to draw.” But if you actually have a mouse in your hand, it’s going to look nothing like your signature, and you’re going to have a really hard time convincing your doctors and hospitals to release your highly sensitive info.

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What happens while you wait? You can see your pending orders under the menu item “Requests.”

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You will also get periodic emails from PatientBank that state in the subject line what’s happening with your request. I really tried to get a good variety of requests going – some hospitals, some large group doctors’ offices, some very small doctor’s offices. The email subject lines would vary from stating that they were still working on my request to the request was successful. There were a couple that had failed. The suggestions regarding why they had failed were that it was possible that I 1) hadn’t been a patient there; 2) it had been too long ago and the records were destroyed; 3) my date of birth was wrong, or 4) my name didn’t match. (I laughed because none of the above applied to me, especially because other doctors referred to my visits to those doctors and they were recent visits.)

At one point I had accidentally requested records from an individual doctor as well as from a large system that took care of his records, so when I received his records as part of the large bundle but still received emails stating his records were pending, I attempted to use a pop-up chat to ask that the individual request be cancelled. Unfortunately, an entire week went by and the chat was not responded to. I resorted to emailing the company and received a response. 

When I started seeing successful results rolling in, I went to check my records. When I clicked on “View” next to the entity that sent records, nothing happened – I just got a blank page with a cloud in the background. I didn’t think this was behaving quite as it should be, but I’m quite click-happy and I got around it for the time being by actually clicking on the button labeled “Download” at the top of the page that is meant for saving the document directly to a drive or computer. I started this process in the month of December, 2016, and now in February, 2017, everything is functioning as it should, so it seems that this is no longer an issue.

I had the opportunity to speak to Kevin Grassi, MD, the Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of PatientBank just a few days ago to go over some of the finer points and challenges of the system. The communication issue with the chat has been resolved and shouldn’t be a problem now, though I haven’t had to use it again, so I can’t confirm. Kevin pointed out that the system has the capability of patients uploading documents so that we truly can have everything in one place (!) – because let me tell you, I have about four discs that I’m tired of keeping track of weirdo passwords to. However, a limitation to that right now is that actual films/scans can’t translate on PatientBank. (If you’ve ever played around on patient portals and been lucky enough to look at CT scans or MRIs, or been in an anatomy class where you can virtually strip a cadaver down to the bones, you will understand how much power is needed for imaging – and then, you know, multiply that by millions for patients…)

An option that Kevin posed to me was the possibility of sharing records. The sharing could be anonymous; the option could be to only allow doctors to look at a patient’s records in case they would like to find similarities for other cases, or the other option would be for patients to find each other. I let Kevin know that I would opt out of both of these. I could really dive deep into why I immediately clench up at the thought of either and both, and right now, this is the best explanation I can offer. First, I have a deep distrust of doctors at this point. Two of the records that I got back from my initial requests included such gems as “I suggested Tai Chi but patient was non-compliant” and “patient is bragging about her surgeries and has Munchhausen’s” (after only seeing me for 20 minutes – and now we know that my brain has literally collapsed and I have a tumor). Second, I am not a big fan of getting into support groups with other patients. Sometimes it turns into a situation where we all end up trying to defend ourselves and our symptoms and the way we feel, and sometimes we all end up really depressed.

One of the features that I really like is that I can actually email a link of my documents to my attorney directly from PatientBank. The University of Minnesota bundle, which I think covers something in the neighborhood of about 8-11 doctors (I gave up counting), is about 250 pages. I have the option to fax directly from PatientBank too, but good grief, why would I?! I’m gonna send the link so my attorney doesn’t fire me!

Kevin assured me that other features will be added in the coming year, so I look forward to trying them out. Technology in healthcare is here to stay and PatientBank is doing a great job of navigating the future.

Visit: PatientBank