Oooooo, That Smell!

For those of you who don’t know me in real life, I am a Taurus (for what it’s worth – not that I base my life on astrology), and we’re known for liking the finer things in life, including the best tastes, the softest fabrics, and the most enticing smells. I couldn’t wait to try this product out because it is both aesthetically appealing and I knew it would throw wonderful flavors into the air, making my Taurus heart sing. (Please note that I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.)

I was provided the “Raindrop” version of the essential oil diffuser by Organic Aromas; the base is available in a light wood color (pictured) or black.

2016-08-27 17.17.30

2016-08-27 17.16.00

At first when I opened the box and glanced through the directions, I wondered if this might be something complicated. After all, there’s a lot of parts – the base, the receptacle, the top, the power cord…and here are the instructions including how to put everything together, and how to care for the piece:

But I think what it comes down to is that the company put a lot of thought into how to make a product that is both beautiful and durable. This isn’t something that you want to have break on you within six months or get so full of gunk that you have to invest in another one. Part of our responsibility in our commitment in striving to use items that are recycled and/or organic and/or generally good for us and our world is that the goal is to not add to the waste exponentially in our landfills and our oceans by not caring for what we build and use. So if you decide to purchase this Aromatherapy Diffuser – and I can smell so much yummy-ness as I write this because I’m running it right now – please take care of your unit so you can enjoy it for a long time to come.

My space in my efficiency apartment/flat (read: my living room is my bedroom) is at a premium, so generally speaking, I don’t have much room to spare for knick knacks. I decided the place that would best serve my needs would be the “window” between my kitchen area and living room/bedroom – mostly because it’s also where one of my two electrical outlets in the entire apartment is located. No joke. I’m almost afraid to run my microwave and my TV at the same time.

I plugged this in and turned the knob on, and immediately it started glowing. What happens is the scented oil circulates within the glass globe, and there is a small opening at the top of the second piece that is seated on the larger piece that you remove when you are adding your oil, so the scent travels out of that small opening but is not overwhelming. Because the oil churns in the larger glass portion it sometimes looks like a fountain inside and is quite calming to watch, like looking out a window on a rainy day. The super, duper cool part of this diffuser is that there is a part that lights up in the center and changes color from green to orange to red to blue and then back to green again. You can see in these pictures what I’m talking about. (Excuse the pose-able figurines, they’re just waiting for their next assignment.)


Something else that’s great is that there is zero noise with these units. The changing colors and no noise factors could make them great for a meditation room or a baby’s nursery or child’s room – just make sure they are kept far enough away from little hands so they can’t be pulled down.

Organic Aromas thoughtfully provided a bottle of their own blend of essential oils so that out of the box, the diffuser could be used right away. However, I always run into this problem: I am deathly allergic to lavender. Even typing that word made me itch. I opened the bottle and took a whiff and it smelled nice enough, but I knew I couldn’t take 2 hours daily of an induced asthma attack. I keep my own organic essential oils on hand to make room and fabric sprays, so I placed peppermint and tangerine oils in my diffuser. Man, my place smells so good! Gone are the stink of my one neighbor’s day-old Dinty Moore stew in the garbage, or my other neighbor’s 20-year-old cat who hasn’t made it to the litter box in at least 5 years.

There is an automatic safety feature on this unit in that it will turn itself off after two hours of continuous running.

I think I found my new little happy place, and it is about 5″ wide by 9″ high and smells like heaven.
Raindrop Diffuser Organic Aromas

Advertisements

Waiting For The Mother Ship

Last Wednesday I went in for a procedure that was new to me, and quite frankly, I didn’t hold out much hope for as far as its success rate went. It was a transabdominal plane (TAP) block. My pain doc, who is fairly close to me in age, very serious, sober, and I suspect severely depressed, hoped this TAP would stop the nerve pain that I get as a result from the allergic reaction to the drainage catheter that winds around my abdominal area. He thought my pain was from my abdomen being cut so many times from all of my surgeries. I indulged him because quite frankly, I’ve got nothing better to do.

When I arrived at the outpatient surgical area, I changed into the ugliest shit brown gym shorts ever, and got a matching pair of shit brown hospital socks with rubber grips for fall prevention. No way would anyone willingly steal these digs (with the exception of one lovely elderly lady who declared them exceedingly comfortable, I was told). I had three nurses ranging in age between 50 and 68 (I’m guessing), all slightly fussy and calling me honey, and addressing me in a loud volume with small words as all surgical nurses are accustomed to doing when coaxing patients out of anesthesia. I was awake and responsive the whole time, but it’s hard to break a habit that takes decades to build.

We discussed all of the yellow on my chart – meaning all of my allergies. We settled on a chlorhexadine scrub rather than a betadine solution to prep my abdomen because of my allergy to shellfish. I watched as my doctor put a long sleeve on the ultrasound paddle that would help guide the needle that would deliver the meds, as he rolled it down and secured it with a rubber band, and I asked, “Oh, is that an elephant condom?” The nurses twittered and the doctor chuckled. Then the nurses got in on the game and tried naming a few other animals with especially big penises. Then we got serious again because it was time to stab me.

The doctor applied some ultrasound gel and pressed the paddle to my abdomen. The nurse at my head put her hand on my shoulder and I closed my eyes. My doc warned me that I would feel the poke and burn. I focused on my heartbeat and forcing it to beat slower, and as if from far away, I heard the nurse say close to my ear that I could squeeze her hand if I needed to. I whispered “No” and refocused again on my breathing. I could hear my heart on the monitor slow down. The doctor said something about enlarging the picture, then needing more “puffs,” and then he finally said he was done and he was going to withdraw the needle. I opened my eyes and my heartbeat increased again, and I saw him pull out a needle that was about four inches long that was attached to a wire.

We did it all over again on the other side: gel, paddle, breathe, focus, heart rate down, needle, pain, puffs, out. I had to have paper tape with gauze over the insertion points because I would have been allergic to what they usually use for gauze pads. The doctor told me afterwards that he had never seen anyone’s heart rate go down as he was inserting the needle and the meds – usually the opposite happened. I told him that I learned a few things from meditation.

I didn’t pay it much mind, but almost immediately, I had developed hives at my insertion sites. I was supposed to keep the gauze on for 24 hours so I didn’t see the hives until the next day. As far as pain relief goes, I didn’t feel any by the time I received a call at noon, but I noticed I had some at about 5:30 that night. However, by Saturday I was laid low by pain again. I emailed my doctor and his nurse to let him know about the hives as well as the ineffectiveness of the block. The hives did not appear across the entire area that they prepped so I know it’s not a reaction to the chlorhexidine – at least I still have that as an option.

If my doctor is depressed, I can understand why. I would feel the same way if I had patients like me.

And whatever this new allergy is, it’s really just another sign that I’m not a native to Earth and that I need to send a signal flare up to the mother ship to scoop me up.

Isn’t That A Co-inky-dink?

This year began on pretty rough ground. First, Quato from Total Recall was growing in my left ass cheek and trying really hard to bust out. Every day for three weeks (including some weekends) someone had to look at my bare ass. Then my body got so stressed out from not being able to stay flat every day that my tremors came back. I have been feeling just exhausted. I wish I had a Keebler elf that I could pull out of my pocket and demand that s/he do all of my dishes and scrub my tub and toilet.

But here’s the thing: I’ve been getting some validations.

The start was getting the image of a lemon cake, the kind like my mom made when I was a kid, in my head. I could picture myself mixing the lemon curd to make the frosting, putting that on the layers, and then cutting myself a slice, still kinda warm. Later on, before I left to go to the meditation class, I caught up with a friend I haven’t talked to in about a decade. She told me that she made herself a lemon cake that afternoon to celebrate her own birthday.

Last night I thought to myself, “Call S. in Scottsdale.” I didn’t know why I thought that, because we talked two weeks ago and I figured that update would have carried us over for a bit. Ten minutes later she called me to tell me she had moved (somewhat abruptly) and her plans changed from what she told me two weeks prior – she decided to stay in Scottsdale rather than pursue a job opportunity elsewhere.

My final ride for the evening yesterday on the short bus involved me being picked up from the grocery store and redeposited at home. It ended up being a really, really long ride – since it’s a ride share, rarely is one rider picked up and then brought to their destination without stopping elsewhere first. The driver and I started chatting while we waited for one rider to finish with her church group. I heard, “Tell her you’re selling your car” in my ear, or brain, or however you’d like to think about it. Anyway, I worked it into the conversation. She became serious and asked me what kind of car it was because she and her husband were looking for a second vehicle. I didn’t really do a hard sell with her because ultimately I didn’t think it would be something she would seriously consider; my car is a hatchback, and she was talking small SUV. Still, it was worth a shot.

I’m not really sure what I have to do to keep connecting with the universe, but I guess I had better get a move on.

 

Seek And Ye Shall Find

Yesterday didn’t strike me as being especially significant. It wasn’t a holiday and my rare disease wasn’t cured, so…

Okay, first of all, I’m paying more attention to the things that bring people to this little blog – and I do mean little. Six months ago I was lucky to get three visitors in a single day. Now my number of visitors is increasing because of the ways that I am networking with other bloggers and the content that I am including.

Nothing could prepare me for some of the search terms indicated by the program, though. (You’re welcome.)

*where does horny women hang in nashville
*fragile handle with care advertise porn
*pantyhose kik names
*stocking fetish social sites in India

Congratulations, and let your freak flag fly. There’s no way for me to identify the people making these searches. I have to point out, though – no one searched for hot, bald, unmarried women?? I mean, it’s been a while since I’ve been proposed to by a total stranger. I hope that issue remedies itself shortly.

In the evening yesterday I took the short bus to a guided meditation session held in a health crisis center. I wasn’t sure how it would go because I tend to just kind of throw my hands up in the air and then rush onto the next thing, whatever that is, to keep my brain stimulated because I get bored easily. During the actual meditation, which really only lasted about 20 minutes, I had to fight against dozing off twice, and luckily I didn’t snore or accidentally pas gas.

Twice I saw an orb rise out of a pool. I only “saw” it to the left of my left eye. I told some of the attendees during our recap about my experience and let them know that their vibes had a specific effect on me. One woman asked me if I had always been able to read strangers’ energy. I have, but I have never really put effort into following through on what I read; usually I push it away or ignore it, which is actually very destructive because then everything gets a free pass into my life and I end up hip deep in crap.

Whatever happened, the universe made a connection appear for me. My short bus driver made a stop after mine to pick up a lady in a wheelchair. She greeted me when she was lifted into the van, and immediately we started chatting. I asked her if she had just come from a dance performance because the building she had come out of was a theater specifically set up for that purpose. The answer was no, in fact; she was on the board for VSA Minnesota, the “state organization on arts and disability” (I got that from the website).

I told her a bit about my arts background as well as what I’m doing now (which is admittedly very little because my days are consumed by endless doctor appointments), and she gave me three organizations to get involved with besides her own to network, meet new people, be creative, and maybe even apply for a grant in my area of interest.

To the casual observer, this may not seem to be a big deal. It just drove home to me the fact that this state is so much more inclusive than where I moved from. I never, ever would have had so many resources to access for my particular physical challenges if I would have stayed in Arizona. I wouldn’t have been able to even ride the short bus because of their strict rules regarding who should be allowed to ride.

Really, meeting and speaking to that woman last night helped to open my eyes to the fact that even though I’ve got these major problems, I might actually be able to find a group of people who can see art where others may only see injury and illness. I am still working on retraining my brain to accept this as my new reality because the doctors have refused to keep operating on me. I still really miss driving my car while harmonizing at the top of my lungs.