Bring It On(line) – Trusting PatientBank With Your Medical Records

I have purchased some awfully pretty, recycled 3-ring binders to haul around my most relevant medical records to my doctor appointments. They’re intimidating because they’re large and they’re many. I also have my own laser printer/copier/fax in my tiny studio apartment. It was the single-most best score from when I lost my job – my former employer let me keep it as my consolation prize, of sorts. But for the love of all that is holy, I cannot carry all of that with me to every appointment. But I need it all! One doctor told me that they have 1,200 pages in their system from only the last 6.5 years that is a combination of what they have logged themselves, and what I have given them.

This is where PatientBank comes in. Disclaimer: I have been given access to PatientBank.us as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

When I received this assignment, I was encouraged to have this company request as many and as much of my medical records as possible. Little did they know that in the last 6.5 years I had seen 57 doctors in 2 different states and who knows how many disciplines (I think 8? Possibly  more). Now, I had just gone through quite a lot of nastiness getting some records because I’ve been trying to get disability as well as go through the process of getting my case looked at by the Undiagnosed Diseases Network through the NIH, so I had had an influx of records shortly before this opportunity.

However, I didn’t have a lot of the records from the past year and a half. The Undiagnosed Diseases Network wanted to go back 10-20 years prior, and my attorney had gotten some records sent directly to him for the more recent stuff, so I figured I could still give PatientBank a pretty good run. I created a login and password at PatientBank and the first logical place to go for new users is to create a new request:

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In this case, I’d like to request a copy of my records from a doctor in Minneapolis, so I can search by his/her name and the state. If his/her name is in the system, I can choose it in the menu. If it isn’t, there is an option to add it.

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After you choose the correct physician, you can specify the date you visited, and whether or not you want “sensitive” info included. If you are not sure what sensitive info means exactly, you can let your mouse hover over the blue text and the black text box pops up and explains what might be included.

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Then you click on “Add to my order.” I got the pop-up screen with a prompt to sign to release my records. Here’s where it’s really, really tricky, folks. I have a touch-screen laptop. You might get pretty good results if you use a smartphone/iPhone. This pop-up window gives you the instruction to “click and hold down to draw.” But if you actually have a mouse in your hand, it’s going to look nothing like your signature, and you’re going to have a really hard time convincing your doctors and hospitals to release your highly sensitive info.

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What happens while you wait? You can see your pending orders under the menu item “Requests.”

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You will also get periodic emails from PatientBank that state in the subject line what’s happening with your request. I really tried to get a good variety of requests going – some hospitals, some large group doctors’ offices, some very small doctor’s offices. The email subject lines would vary from stating that they were still working on my request to the request was successful. There were a couple that had failed. The suggestions regarding why they had failed were that it was possible that I 1) hadn’t been a patient there; 2) it had been too long ago and the records were destroyed; 3) my date of birth was wrong, or 4) my name didn’t match. (I laughed because none of the above applied to me, especially because other doctors referred to my visits to those doctors and they were recent visits.)

At one point I had accidentally requested records from an individual doctor as well as from a large system that took care of his records, so when I received his records as part of the large bundle but still received emails stating his records were pending, I attempted to use a pop-up chat to ask that the individual request be cancelled. Unfortunately, an entire week went by and the chat was not responded to. I resorted to emailing the company and received a response. 

When I started seeing successful results rolling in, I went to check my records. When I clicked on “View” next to the entity that sent records, nothing happened – I just got a blank page with a cloud in the background. I didn’t think this was behaving quite as it should be, but I’m quite click-happy and I got around it for the time being by actually clicking on the button labeled “Download” at the top of the page that is meant for saving the document directly to a drive or computer. I started this process in the month of December, 2016, and now in February, 2017, everything is functioning as it should, so it seems that this is no longer an issue.

I had the opportunity to speak to Kevin Grassi, MD, the Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of PatientBank just a few days ago to go over some of the finer points and challenges of the system. The communication issue with the chat has been resolved and shouldn’t be a problem now, though I haven’t had to use it again, so I can’t confirm. Kevin pointed out that the system has the capability of patients uploading documents so that we truly can have everything in one place (!) – because let me tell you, I have about four discs that I’m tired of keeping track of weirdo passwords to. However, a limitation to that right now is that actual films/scans can’t translate on PatientBank. (If you’ve ever played around on patient portals and been lucky enough to look at CT scans or MRIs, or been in an anatomy class where you can virtually strip a cadaver down to the bones, you will understand how much power is needed for imaging – and then, you know, multiply that by millions for patients…)

An option that Kevin posed to me was the possibility of sharing records. The sharing could be anonymous; the option could be to only allow doctors to look at a patient’s records in case they would like to find similarities for other cases, or the other option would be for patients to find each other. I let Kevin know that I would opt out of both of these. I could really dive deep into why I immediately clench up at the thought of either and both, and right now, this is the best explanation I can offer. First, I have a deep distrust of doctors at this point. Two of the records that I got back from my initial requests included such gems as “I suggested Tai Chi but patient was non-compliant” and “patient is bragging about her surgeries and has Munchhausen’s” (after only seeing me for 20 minutes – and now we know that my brain has literally collapsed and I have a tumor). Second, I am not a big fan of getting into support groups with other patients. Sometimes it turns into a situation where we all end up trying to defend ourselves and our symptoms and the way we feel, and sometimes we all end up really depressed.

One of the features that I really like is that I can actually email a link of my documents to my attorney directly from PatientBank. The University of Minnesota bundle, which I think covers something in the neighborhood of about 8-11 doctors (I gave up counting), is about 250 pages. I have the option to fax directly from PatientBank too, but good grief, why would I?! I’m gonna send the link so my attorney doesn’t fire me!

Kevin assured me that other features will be added in the coming year, so I look forward to trying them out. Technology in healthcare is here to stay and PatientBank is doing a great job of navigating the future.

Visit: PatientBank

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